Thursday, October 30, 2014

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Oct. 25 Medjugorje Message

"Dear children! Pray in this time of grace and seek the intercession of all the saints who are already in the light. From day to day may they be an example and encouragement to you on the way of your conversion. Little children, be aware that your life is short and passing. Therefore, yearn for eternity and keep preparing your hearts in prayer. I am with you and intercede before my Son for each of you, especially for those who have consecrated themselves to me and to my Son. Thank you for having responded to my call."


Friday, October 24, 2014

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Some Links

"I cannot waste any more time debating with those who are “little popes,” who refuse to humbly and carefully examine the facts and what our Tradition teaches; those cowards who stand at a distance casting stones over the Vatican walls at the Holy Father; those armchair theologians who judge and condemn as though they sat on thrones ("super apostles" as St. Paul called them); those who, hiding behind avitars and anonymous names, betray Christ and the family of God by attacking the rock which He established; those who passively-aggressively obey the Holy Father while casting him in deep suspicion, harming the faith of the little ones, and dividing families through fear." --Mark Mallett, The Testing

Other posts by Mark Mallett:

Can a Pope be a Heretic?

The Five Corrections

Steady as She Goes

The Synod and the Spirit

Not Oak


Oak leaves are the most intransigent corpses,
piling over ground, slathering roads,
a ply of tannin shield that holds
their dead selves undissolving, past the maple's
matting litter pulp, and grass-eaten coins
of the katsura, aspen, birch.

Maple too is nemesis to sewer drains.
But oak the all-weathering Saxon,
has the whole of fall and winter for its fain
dropping and clinging, such that on
oak leaves strewing, there resides a cohering air,
not much changed in colour from colour,

hardened without crumbling, no sunset blood
in them, such as maples lave in floods
that gives the raker some exchange. Not oak.
And so also its thousand-raining acorns.
And so its trunk and limbs - unending presence.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Pride is from hell


Two classic essays by the master essayist G.K. Chesterton are on humility and pride.

Here is a quote from the essay on pride, entitled, If I Had Only One Sermon To Preach:


"There is produced also a sort of subconscious ossification; which hardens the mind not only against the traditions of the past, but even against the surprises of the future. Nil admirari becomes the motto of all nihilists; and it ends, in the most complete and exact sense, in nothing."


Here is a quote from Pope Francis' closing speech for the Synod:

"One, a temptation to hostile inflexibility [trans: rigidity], that is, wanting to close oneself within the written word, (the letter) and not allowing oneself to be surprised by God, by the God of surprises, (the spirit); within the law, within the certitude of what we know and not of what we still need to learn and to achieve."


Here is another quote from the pride essay:


"The moment the self within is consciously felt as something superior to any of the gifts that can be brought to it, or any of the adventures that it may enjoy, there has appeared a sort of self-devouring fastidiousness and a disenchantment in advance, which fulfils all the Tartarean emblems of thirst and of despair."

Here is another quote from Pope Francis' closing speech:


"...and also to transform the bread into a stone and cast it against the sinners, the weak, and the sick (cf Jn 8:7), that is, to transform it into unbearable burdens (Lk 11:46)."

and:

"The temptation to neglect the “depositum fidei” [the deposit of faith], not thinking of themselves as guardians but as owners or masters [of it]..."


Here is a quote from G.K.C.'s essay on humility, A Defense Of Humility:


"Looking down on things may be a delightful experience, only there is nothing, from a mountain to a cabbage, that is really seen when it is seen from a balloon. The philosopher of the ego sees everything, no doubt, from a high and rarified heaven; only he sees everything foreshortened or deformed."


Here is a quote from Pope Francis' closing speech:

"And this is the Church, the vineyard of the Lord, the fertile Mother and the caring Teacher, who is not afraid to roll up her sleeves to pour oil and wine on people’s wound; who doesn’t see humanity as a house of glass to judge or categorize people."

and:

"Many commentators, or people who talk, have imagined that they see a disputatious Church where one part is against the other, doubting even the Holy Spirit, the true promoter and guarantor of the unity and harmony of the Church – the Holy Spirit who throughout history has always guided the barque, through her Ministers, even when the sea was rough and choppy, and the ministers unfaithful and sinners."


Anyways, my allegiance is with Peter.








"When we shut our door on the wind, it would be equally true to say that the wind shuts its door on us. Whatever virtues a triumphant egoism really leads to, no one can reasonably pretend that it leads to knowledge. Turning a beggar from the door may be right enough, but pretending to know all the stories the beggar might have narrated is pure nonsense; and this is practically the claim of the egoism which thinks that self-assertion can obtain knowledge." --G.K. Chesterton, A Defense Of Humility

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Intellectual Pride


Great is the fall that goes with that sin.

Great and hard and horrible and complete.

It is the masterpiece of sin.

Great, hard, horrible and complete.

It is the worst of the worst.

Write it on a sticky note.

Stick it on the fridge.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Friday, October 17, 2014

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Basic money stuff


So a government "borrows" 4 billion dollars to have a bridge built.

The money did not exist before, whether the bank from which it "borrows" is publicly owned (as in Canada) or private (as in the U.S.).

This is a transaction. The transaction is what brings that money into existence. The money did not exist before. That is the way it works. The promise to pay 4 billions dollars, plus compounding interest on top of the four billion dollars over time, is what brings the money into existence.

So the government makes this transaction with the bank in order to get a bridge built. Commuters have to pay a toll fee for thirty plus years. They have to pay the fee (whether a direct fee or through taxes) for thirty plus years in order to "pay off" the "cost" to build the bridge which also includes compounding interest. It will take thirty plus years to "pay off" the "cost" to build the bridge mostly because of compounding interest - compounding interest on the money that was "borrowed" that didn't exist before it was "borrowed".

Just a moment...ROFLMAO!!!!!

Anyways, where was I? Oh yes, debt as a precursor and attachment to the issuance of money.

Though that bridge has been built, has been completed, and you can touch the bridge, and it is a solid bridge and a stable bridge, and you can drive across it (paying a fee both ways), yet it is not actually wealth evidence.

Why and how so? Precisely because the transaction has not been completed.

It is in effect a thirty plus year transaction. Debt and delay: the velocity with which transactions come to completion is...how does one say...of the essence.

Velocity does not mean "efficiency" or "speed" necessarily. We are talking about proportionality. Attaching thirty plus years onto the building of a bridge is wickedly disproportionate.

We really need to understand what sort of burden debt causes - and for what?

Money can be inflated, deflated, brought to a grinding crash, whatever - and resurrected the very next day. Gold is given value. Moreover, we owners of gold give gold value precisely through transaction. Transaction is the way in which gold receives its value by owners of gold. Then they up the ante of its value further through high frequency trading. It's all fiat no matter what.

Money is a sterile instrument. Money is a means. Saving? Saving implies spending, by someone, at some point. Save a bunch of money. Don't spend it but pass it on to your inheritor. And he in turn does not spend it but passes it on to his inheritor. That one in turn does not spend it but passes it on to his inheritor, and so on, and on, all the way to doomsday. That money is worth less than nothing. That money which has been saved all the way to doomsday is in fact less than waste. A man cutting down a big old tree just for the sake of letting it rot into the ground would be better, for at least he has provided the ecosystem with the nutrition and good bacteria of its decomposition.

Proportion: the quantity of money issued into circulation without debt to anyone by a transparent agency held to account by the public.